SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Jan. 16, 2013 /Christian Newswire/ — Sandra Cano, the real name of “Mary Doe,” the fictitious name of the Plaintiff in Doe v. Bolton, the companion case to Roe v. Wade, is available for telephone/radio interviews concerning the 40th anniversary of her case, one of the two cases that brought legalized abortion to America.

Sandra Cano has the following to say:

“It is time for the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse my case, Doe v. Bolton, and Roe v. Wade. It is time to break this curse on our nation and on my life. I was fraudulently used by the Court system to bring abortion to America. No one should have a right to kill their children. No mother should ever want to do so. It is time for a breakthrough to cancel and annul Doe v. Bolton, which is a covenant with death. This year the Supreme Court should correct its own errors and reverse Roe and Doe. This is the year of freedom.” 
Doe v. Bolton was the companion case to Roe v. Wade and decided on the same day, January 22, 1973. Doe v. Bolton was the more deceptive case than Roe v. Wade and created the health exception, including psychological health, which allows abortion up to the moment of birth.

Sandra Cano has testified in federal court, by affidavit, that the original affidavit in Doe v. Bolton purporting to claim that she was seeking an abortion was in fact fraudulent and it is not her signature or with her knowledge.

But rather than being psychologically ill, she actually did not want to have an abortion and fled to Oklahoma rather than being forced to have an abortion, during the pendency of the case. For her full explanation, click here.

Sandra Cano has been a prominent historical figure in two major Supreme Court decisions on abortion. First, as the named plaintiff “Mary Doe” in Doe v. Bolton, and more importantly, she was the main party, in the only friend of the court brief cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in Gonzalez v. Carhart, the last Supreme Court decision on abortion which held that abortion did cause “severe depression” for some women.

http://txjf.org/

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